What you need to know about the World Cup and what to watch for

What you need to know about the World Cup and what to watch for

In the lead up to the 2019 World Cup, a series of changes are taking place around the world, including the resignation of the International Olympic Committee’s executive committee.

Here are five things to know.

1.

It’s not over yet: World Cup 2019 has not been a perfect year for FIFA.

On the eve of the tournament, FIFA suspended its investigation into Russia’s election of its President after a report into the 2018 vote, and the committee announced it would not be renewing its mandate to investigate the 2018 election.

On Tuesday, FIFA’s executive board confirmed that it would review its procedures for the 2022 World Cup to ensure that any irregularities in that vote were investigated, but the organisation did not say how much it would change.

A committee of senior FIFA officials is also due to meet on Friday to discuss the future of the 2018 World Cup.

“I would like to make it clear that we will not rest until all the facts are in, the votes are tallied and the results are declared,” FIFA Secretary General Jerome Valcke said at the time.

2.

It wasn’t all bad news for the World Football Association: The International Football Association Board (IFAB) was formed in 2014 and its job is to protect the integrity of football in the world.

Its members have voted to support a number of changes at the top of Fifa, including lifting sanctions on Qatar and removing sanctions on several former Fifa officials.

This includes a proposal to reduce the size of the 2022 bidding process from 12 to nine members and to cut the number of candidates from 80 to 53.

However, these proposals have been criticised by the World football association.

As a result, the IFAB has been struggling to hold its members together.

And, although the board is looking at new reforms, there is no guarantee that these will be implemented.

3.

FIFA’s election was hacked: At the start of the week, a group of hackers released more than 100 million emails from FIFA’s headquarters in Zurich.

It was a shocking breach, with hundreds of emails from top executives including President Sepp Blatter leaked to WikiLeaks and the leaked emails show that the president’s office had been told to “be ready to retaliate” after he lost the 2022 election.

Blatter had been hoping to win the 2022 tournament.

But this was his last chance to win.

4.

FIFA could still lose money: FIFA has already paid out more than $150 million to former officials and officials who were investigated in the 2022 vote.

In February 2019, the International Monetary Fund estimated that FIFA would have to pay out between $40 million and $50 million in compensation for the votes.

However this has been a controversial measure and it is unclear how much will be collected.

If it is not enough to cover the damages, FIFA could lose its financial support and face a possible suspension from the global sports organisation.

5.

The World Cup will be played in 2021: It’s been a long wait since FIFA hosted a major international sporting event.

However it’s unlikely that it will go ahead again this time around, with the World Congress of Families warning that it “has no confidence in the integrity” of the voting process.

“We will continue to fight for the rights of women, children, people of colour and those who have been disenfranchised,” the WCF said in a statement.

“In the years to come, we will be watching this event and looking to the future.”

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